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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

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taroc4, with cards so high5, to the number of seventy-eight. There are three or four English here; Lord Lincoln6, with
Spence7, your Professor of Poetry; a Mr. B------, and a
Mr. C------, a man that never utters a syllable.   We have
tried all stratagems to make him speak. Yesterday he did at last open his mouth, and said Bee. We all laughed so at the novelty of the thing that he shut it again, and will never speak more. I think you can't complain now of my not writing to you. What a volume of trifles! I wrote just the fellow to it from Geneva; had it you ?
Farewell!   Thine,
HOR. WALPOLE.
22.   To BICHARD WEST.
From Bologna, 1739.
I DON'T know why I told Ashton I would send you an account of what I saw: don't believe it, I don't intend it. Only think what a vile employment 'tis, making catalogues! And then one should have that odious Curl1 get at one's letters, and publish them like Whitfield's Journal*, or for a supplement to the Traveller's Pocket-companion. Dear West, I protest against having seen anything but what all the world has seen ; nay, I have not seen half that, not
4 A contemporary description of the game of taroc or minchiate is given by De Brosses (Lettres Fami-li&res, XLIV).
6 Miss Berry remarks in a note that in the MS. this word is •written in a larger hand than the rest of the letter.
6 Henry Fiennes Pelham-Clinton (1720-1794), ninth Earl of Lincoln; succeeded his uncle as second Duke of Newcastle, 1768. Lord of the Bedchamber, 1743-62; Cofferer of the Household, 1746-54; Joint Comptroller of the Customs of London,
1749-94; K.Gt. 1752.
7 Bev. Joseph Spence (d. 1768), at this time travelling with Lord Lincoln. He was Professor of Poetry at Oxford, 1728-88; Professor of Modern History at Oxford, 1742. In 1768 Ms Parallel of Magliabecchi and, Mr. Hill was published at Strawberry Hill, He is best known by his Anecdotes, published after his death.
LETTER 22.—* Edmund Curll (1675-1747).
2 Portions of the Journal of George WMtefield, the celebrated preacher, were published in 1739.